गुरुवार, 30 अगस्त 2012

journalism.org / Analysis: Our Studies






This section, Studies, contains PEJ's major empirical research studies, including our annual reports on the state of journalism divided into searchable subchapters. They are listed below in chronological order. Or you can use the menus on the left to filter our entire archive and find exactly what you want.
  • The Master Character Narratives in Campaign 2012

    On the eve of the conventions, the portrayal in the news media of the character and records of the two presidential contenders in 2012 has been as negative as any campaign in recent times, and neither candidate has enjoyed any advantage over the other. What are the main media narratives about each candidate? Where do these themes originate? And which ones are breaking through with voters? PEJ’s latest report on news coverage of election 2012 offers answers.
  • How the Presidential Candidates Use the Web and Social Media

    On the eve of the conventions, Barack Obama holds a distinct advantage over Mitt Romney in the way his campaign is using digital technology to communicate directly with voters. The Obama campaign is posting almost four times as much content and is active on nearly twice as many platforms, according to a new study analyzing the content and volume of candidate communications on their websites and social media channels.
  • YouTube & News

    News is becoming a major part of what Americans watch on YouTube. In the last 15 months, a third of the most searched terms on the video sharing site were news related. A new study by the Project for Excellence in Journalism explores the character of news on YouTube.
  • Facebook IPO Not Selling on Social Media

    The Facebook IPO was a hot topic on blogs, Twitter and Facebook last week with doubts about the stock’s value exceeding bullishness on the investment.  And the topics of conversation—which ranged from Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s wedding to co-founder Eduardo Saverin’s citizenship—varied by social media platform.
  • Gingrich Bows Out as the General Election Battle Takes Shape

    Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich ended his presidential campaign with a final week of unflattering and relatively sparse coverage and Mitt Romney's campaign narrative appeared to benefit from some high profile endorsements.

  • How the Media Covered the 2012 Primary Campaign

    As the 2012 presidential race shifts from the GOP primary battle to the general election matchup between Mitt Romney and Barack Obama, a new PEJ study reveals what the public has been told about the two candidates by the media.  It also finds that Mitt Romney emerged as the winner of the media primary weeks before Rick Santorum dropped out.
  • How Blogs, Twitter and Mainstream Media Have Handled the Trayvon Martin Case: Special Report

    It took several weeks after the killing of teenager Trayvon Martin before the story exploded in the media. A new PEJ report reveals how social and mainstream media platforms focused on different elements of the controversy and how ideology influenced coverage on the cable and radio talk shows.
  • The Search for a New Business Model

    How close are America's beleaguered newspapers to solving their revenue problems? A new report from PEJ that includes detailed case studies of dozens of daily papers and interviews with newspaper company executives finds an industry struggling to reinvent itself, but also some hopeful success stories.
  • Religion in the News

    The biggest religion stories during 2011 centered on tensions over Islam and the U.S. presidential campaign, with more than half of the politically-focused coverage involving Republican hopeful Mitt Romney and his Mormon faith, according to a new study.
  • Digital Advertising and News

    With digital ad revenue projected to overtake all other platforms by 2016, it is the key to the financial future of news. Are news organizations transitioning their legacy advertisers to online platforms? A PEJ report analyzing more than 5,000 ads from 22 news outlets offers answers.

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