गुरुवार, 30 अगस्त 2012

media Books



The people of PEJ have produced a number of books, often drawing on the research we've conducted. Click these links to learn more about these books and how to order them.
  • Blur: How to Know What’s True in the Age of Information Overload

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    Amid the hand-wringing over the death of "true journalism" in the Internet Age—the din of bloggers, the echo chamber of Twitter, the predominance of Wikipedia—veteran journalists and media critics Bill Kovach and Tom Rosenstiel have written a pragmatic, serious-minded guide to navigating the twenty-first century media terrain. Yes, old authorities are being dismantled, new ones created, and the very nature of knowledge has changed. But seeking the truth remains the purpose of journalism—and the object for those who consume it. How do we discern what is reliable? How do we determine which facts (or whose opinions) to trust? Blur provides a road map, or more specifically, reveals the craft that has been used in newsrooms by the very best journalists for getting at the truth. In an age when the line between citizen and journalist is becoming increasingly unclear, Blur is a crucial guide for those who want to know what's true.
  • We Interrupt This Newscast: How to Improve Local News and Win Ratings, Too

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    “We Interrupt This Newscast: How to Improve Local News and Win Ratings Too” uses empirical evidence, social science analysis and actual ratings data to disprove much of the conventional wisdom about what works to win viewers in local TV news. The work is based on five years of research of 154 stations in 50 markets – more than 33,000 stories, plus survey data of news professionals and workshop interviews with more than 2,000 TV journalists. The findings show that flashing lights, yellow police tape and “hook and hold” structure of most newscasts actually drive viewers away. So does that idea that only certain topics are interesting. Instead, the book shows that by telling stories better, with more balance, deeper sourcing, and more real information, newscasts have a undisputable record of winning in the marketplace. The problem is there just aren't enough of those kinds of stories.
  • The Elements of Journalism : What Newspeople Should Know and the Public Should Expect, Completely Updated and Revised

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    By Bill Kovach and Tom Rosenstiel
    The Elements of Journalism delineates the core principles shared by journalists across media, even across cultures. These principles flow from the essential function news plays in people's lives. This new edition, published April 2007, is completely updated and revised and includes a new 10th principle--the rights and responsibilites of citizens--flowing from new power conveyed by technology to the citizen as a consumer and editor of their own news and information.
  • Thinking Clearly: Cases in Journalistic Decision Making

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    Edited by Tom Rosenstiel and Amy Mitchell
    Working with academic advisors and a team of long-time journalists, the Project for Excellence in Journalism created a case study curriculum for teaching journalistic process and practice. This unique journalism textbook offers students the opportunity to discuss eight case studies in decision-making — including: Watergate, online journalism, the Clinton-Lewinsky scandal, and the Columbine school shooting.
  • Warp Speed: America in the Age of Mixed Media

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    By Bill Kovach and Tom Rosenstiel
    The Clinton Lewinsky scandal was the moment the post O.J media culture came to Washington and the coverage of politics. In Warp Speed: America in the Age of Mixed Media, Bill Kovach and Tom Rosenstiel outline the contours of the new media landscape through the coverage of this pivotal moment, a time when the old journalism of verification gave way to a new journalism of assertion. With a preface by David Halberstam.

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